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Trump Touts 'America First' At The United Nations

Originally published on September 25, 2018 8:36 am Updated at 11:22 a.m. ET. President Trump defended his "America First" agenda in a speech to the United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday, in effect spiking the football at what his secretary of state described as the "Super Bowl of diplomacy." "The United States is a stronger, safer, and richer country than it was when I assumed office less than two years ago," Trump declared. "We are standing up for America and the American people and we...

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Violent crime stayed essentially flat last year, according to statistics just released by the FBI. Those crimes were down by 0.2 percent last year, after a sharp increase of more than 5 percent the year before.

That means violent crime has essentially plateaued at a level higher than the record lows of a few years ago — but is still substantially lower than the high rates of the 1980s and 1990s.

Meet Philadelphia Flyers' New Mascot

47 minutes ago

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Image used courtesy of Jere Gettle

Welcome to The Seeds of September – this week on Cultivating Place we kick off our four-part series in conversation with Jere Gettle of Baker Creek Seeds, and more from the Organic Seed Alliance and Redwood Seeds. I think you’re going to love it! 

For photos visit cultivatingplace.com. The show is available as a podcast on SoundCloudiTunesGoogle Play and Stitcher

Dan Brekke

Massive rebuilding work at the failed Oroville Dam spillways is racking up a matching price tag.  

 

According to a construction update released by the Department of Water Resources Wednesday, the cost estimate rose to $1.1 billion, four times the initial $275 million dollar estimate.  

 

Prayitno

This week we stop off in once-sleepy San Miguel, a spot in the road just north of Paso Robles, not quite so sleepy now that Central Coast wineries have attracted fame, fortunes, and the fortunate.

 

Centerpiece of the tiny town is Mission San Miguel Arcàngel, 16th of California’s 21 missions, originally built in 1797 and still an active parish church. The mission has been brought low before, by fire or earthquakes and their aftermath—and early on, first in 1806. The rebuilt church, with tiled, not thatched roofs this time, rising again in 1821. As an agricultural enterprise Mission San Miguel was immensely successful, like others in the area. Its holdings extended 18 miles to the south, 18 miles to the north, 66 miles to the east, into and across the great Central Valley, and 35 miles west, to the Pacific Ocean.

This post is no longer being updated. Please click here for NSPR's latest reporting on the Delta Fire. 

 This story was last updated at 3:45 p.m. on 9/5/18

Standup comedian Paula Poundstone is a popular panelist on NPR's weekly news quiz show, "Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me," and will be bringing her improvisational humor to Laxson Auditorium in Chico on September 21st.

Marc Albert

Following several hours of contentious accusations, theorizing, and finger-pointing, a tense hearing about homelessness in Chico boiled over at Tuesday's city council meeting. 

As a decision on reimposing a local law barring people from sitting or lying down on downtown sidewalks drew near, pandemonium broke out as activists drowned out proceedings with noisy tactics borrowed from the Occupy Wall Street demonstrations of a decade ago.

stnorbert / Flickr, Creative Commons

A bill sitting on Governor Jerry Brown’s desk attempts to address the long waits faced by students for counseling. If approved, Senate Bill 968 would require each University of California and California State University campus to have the equivalent of one, full time ‘mental health counselor’ for every 1,500 students.

Language in the bill claims one in four students has a diagnosable mental illness and that only 60 percent of students seek care.

Today we’re joined by El Dorado rock band, Island of Black and White. Originally formed in 2005, the group started as an acoustic duo led by songwriter Chris Haislet. Over time the band began to add more members, including percussionist and band manager Nawal Haislet, who Chris credits for taking the group to the next level as career musicians. For the last ten years Island of Black and White has been actively traveling across the country to perform their versatile blend of blues, rock, reggae and Americana music. We talk with the band about their approach to songwriting, and hear an in-studio performance of their song "West Edge".

We talk with Josh Hegg from Uncle Dad's Art Collective about the group's upcoming event in Chico, Weaverville, Orland and Redding -- "Small Town Big Sound 2018" which showcases 15 northstate singer-songwriters, backing up their performances with a big band orchestra. We also talk with two people from the creative team behind "The Butcher Shop," the only-in-Chico festival of original experimental plays and art-creations, happening Labor Day weekend.

In this episode of Blue Dot we go hurricane hunting with Commander Justin Kibbe. A veteran combat pilot, Justin flies the intrument laden NOAA turbo prop airplanes that fly into the maw of the world's most powerful storms. Hear what it is like to fly through the eyewall of a massive tropical storm into the eye of a hurricane in search of data to help us better understand one of nature's most destructive forces. Then one of the scientists that flies with Kibbe, hurricane meteorologist Jonathan Zawislak as he tells us what kinds of data he collects and what we learn from these amazing flights into storms that can wreak havoc on sea and land.

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There’s still time to head up the road for a late-summer adventure. Plan a trip with help from this new map of California destinations featured by Kim Weir on her show Up the Road on NSPR.

Blue Dot, named after Carl Sagan's famous speech about our place in the universe, features interviews with guests from all over the regional, national and worldwide scientific communities.

On Cultivating Place, we speak with people passionate about plants, gardens, and natural history. We explore what gardens mean to us and how they speak to us.

Each week host Nancy Wiegman talks to local, regional and national writers about their latest projects.

With our new series Since You Asked, we're turning to YOU. What have you always wondered about the North State? What questions do you have about this place we call home?

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