Nancy Wiegman

Host, Nancy's Bookshelf

Nancy Wiegman has a master's degree in French linguistics from Indiana University and taught yoga and foreign languages at CSU Fresno and the College of Charleston before moving to Chico in 1990.

For seven years she acted and danced in productions such as Singin' in the Rain, Mary Poppins, The Real Inspector Hound, Biloxi Blues, and Steel Magnolias.

In 1999, Nancy was named Outstanding Woman of Chico and received a Maggie Award in 2002.

She directs the yoga program at Chico Sports Club and has been teaching yoga there since 1994.

She became a classical announcer at KCHO in 1990 and often hosted the hourlong call-in show "I-5 LIVE!" on North State Public Radio, occasionally Weekend Showcase, and started Nancy's Bookshelf in July of 2007 after producing a series of four-minutes spots called "Health Desk," which aired during All Things Considered.

Nancy is also a certified pilgrim, having walked sections of the Camino de Santiago de Compostela in Spain and France many times beginning in 2005.

 

 

Redding author Ben Letton's book is a historical perspective of Trinity County and Northern California through the story of cowboy Bud Jackson's life (1912 - 2007). Bud hunted mountain lions, mined gold, tracked fugitives, and solved murder mysteries. What began as impromptu recordings around the kitchen table led to this collection of colorful tales. From Bud, Ben learned skills passed down by native Americans, and even named one of his sons "Jackson" in honor of his friend and mentor Bud Jackson.

 

Irene got pregnant at age 15, and her marriage got off to a rocky start when she and her husband Domingo married at 16. The marriage lasted, and over the past 45 years, they have birthed, fostered, or adopted 32 children, many with special needs.   With the help of bestselling author Lissa Halls Johnson, Irene tells the stories of these remarkable children in Part 2 of her interview. She describes washing lice out of one child's hair, and now another child's cancer touched the heart of his oncologist.  

 

Irene got pregnant at age 15, and her marriage got off to a rocky start when she and her husband Domingo married at 16. The marriage lasted, and over the past 45 years, they have birthed, fostered, or adopted 32 children, many with special needs.   With the help of bestselling author Lissa Halls Johnson, Irene tells the stories of these remarkable children.  

Butte College English teacher Joe Abbott wrote a comic novel about a Californian who gets stuck in a small town in rural mid-America. Fans of Greek mythology will enjoy his allusions to classical mythology woven into his story.

Retired Butte College English teacher Marianne Werner combines her interests in travel, photography and poetry to create a poetry collection featuring photographs of nature taken in exotic places and poems inspired by nature.  

Oroville resident Pamela Saraga started writing after retiring from working 37 years for the US Postal Service. For a year she wrote for the column "North State Voices" in the Oroville Mercury Register. Her novel Amazon Diet is about a group of overweight women who decide to take an adventure vacation in Suriname to have fun and lose some weight.

Alexa Benson-Valavanis is president and CEO of a philanthropic foundation based in Chico. When she was 25, she was making plans to enter a Buddhist monastery in Nova Scotia when a encounter with a stranger resulted in an invitation to work in Shanghai, China. In a three-year journey from Shanghai to Hong Kong, Guatemala to Vietnam, Alexa struggled to reconcile her sexuality with her longing for a relationship with God.

Maralee Wofford (pen name Maralee Lowder) writes novels about the Old Mortuary in Dunsmuir, California which has converted into an inn. The building is thought to be haunted and ghosts have been seen there. 

When local author David Allee lived in Hawaii, he heard of haunted places there and has written a historical novel based on what he learned.

Eric Miller is a former "North State Voices" columnist for the Chico Enterprise-Record and Etc. Guy blogger. His stories are inspired by his life as a husband, a father of two teenage daughters, and son of adventurous parents.

After being awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, poet, writer, singer, and teacher Maya Angelou came to Chico in 2011. Her interview with Nancy was originally recorded then. Dr. Angelou died on May 28, 2014, and the interview about her life and her latest book, a cookbook, was rebroadcast.

In part two of an interview with war correspondent Ann Scott Tyson and her husband Jim Gant, she tells why Osama bin Laden wanted her husband killed.

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