Sarah Bohannon

Interim News Director

Sarah is one of the early birds of the NSPR team, hosting Morning Edition. She grew up in the North State – in the small town of Biggs – before heading off to enjoy the beautiful beaches of Santa Cruz. After finishing her general education at Cabrillo College, Sarah attended Chico State. There she earned a degree in journalism and a minor in nutrition. During her time at the university, Sarah wrote for the college’s award-winning newspaper, the Orion. She also worked as both a news intern and the associate producer of the series “Reflections” at North State Public Radio. Sarah’s previous experience also includes two years working in multimedia at a local nonprofit, where she created educational materials about farming and nutrition. Along with being the station's interim news director, Sarah is the producer of the programs Cultivating Place, Up the Road and Common Ground for Common Good

Dave Schlom

This story was last updated 10/9/18 at 7:55 a.m.

Two fires burning near Red Bluff are now 60 percent contained and more than 3,800 acres in size, according to Cal Fire

The incident is called the Sun Fire. It started Sunday at 12:51 p.m. 

Cal Fire is repting the incident is located off of Highway 36 and Sunriver Drive, east of Red Bluff.

Evacuations are still in progress for Stice Road and Andreni Road.

 

There’s an ancient association between the botanical world and art inspired by it. This week on Cultivating Place, we kick off a four-part series in which we hear about the process, purpose and passions of five different artists all expressing their love for plants through their artistry.

Today we hear from the bold and the heroic when we’re joined by botanical illustrator Kate Blairstone of Portland, Oregon, followed by a conversation with international urban muralist, Mona Caron. Join us.

Albert Lam

This week we head up the road to revisit Joshua Tree, about an hour north of Coachella Valley and party-central Palm Springs. Temperatures are 100-plus most of the summer, so this isn’t most people’s idea of an ideal summer retreat, though on the plus side: in summer, you can grab a prime camp spot even on weekends without a reservation. In winter it’s crazy-popular (meaning, congested), so spring and fall can be the best for Joshua Tree.

Shane Ede / Flickr, Creative Commons

The brain is all about the survival of the being. To help us survive, during the day our brains create memories that are consolidated and adapted during Rapid Eye Movement or REM sleep. But if a trauma occurs, sometimes the brain can't consolidate and adapt memories. If this occurs repeatedly it can lead to Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder or PTSD. 

Photo used courtesy of Matthew Benson

This week on Cultivating Place, our final in the Seeds of September series we're joined by Matthew Benson of Stonegate Farm in New York's Hudson Valley, where he is his very own, very small agricultural district sowing seeds to grow other growers. Join us! 

Jim Dollar

We visit Death Valley this week, the lowest point in North America. Death Valley’s depths are all the more impressive when you consider that the highest point in the continental U.S., Mount Whitney, is just 100 miles away, in the southern Sierra Nevada near Lone Pine.

 

To stargazers, Death Valley is the closest thing to heaven in light-blinded Southern California. To rockhounds, it’s a timeless monument to very grounded geologic grandeur. To botanists and bird-watchers, it’s a study in successful adaptation. Its vast spaces sprinkled with petroglyphs, ghost towns, mine ruins, and other enduring marks of human aspiration, to hikers and history buffs it’s one endless discovery trail. 

Image used courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

A person has died due to complications of West Nile Virus, according to the Butte County Health Department. According to a press release, this marks the first human death from the virus in Butte County for 2018.

According to the release, the person became symptomatic in mid-August, they were between the ages of 50 to 70, and they lived in southern Butte County. The infection was confirmed last Friday and was the neuro-invasive type of the disease, which is the most severe form of the virus.

Image used courtesy of the National Weather Service

Nimshew Fire

An evacuation warning is in effect for a fire burning near Magalia.

According to the Butte County Sheriff the warning is for the area of Centerville Road from the Nimshew Road intersection south to Pasa Lane.

At last report from Cal Fire’s Butte Unit the fire was 25 acres in size. It’s burning in steep terrain with heavy brush and at a slow-moderate rate.

Photo used courtesy of Rowen White

This week on Cultivating Place, the third installment in the Seeds of September four part series– we’re joined by Rowen White, founder of Sierra Seeds a seed and seed advocacy cooperative in Nevada County, Calif. Rowen, a Mohawk woman who serves on the Indigenous Seed Keeper’s Network and is current chair of Seed Savers Exchange, shares with us her love, purpose and poetry of seed stewardship. Join us!

Sharon Mollerus

We visit Mission San Juan Capistrano this week, the seventh California mission, first claimed by Spain in 1775 but officially founded in November of 1776. It’s still a bit hard to believe that a schmaltzy 1939 song by Leon René, When the Swallows Come Back to Capistrano—recorded by everyone from Gene Autry and Glenn Miller to the Ink Spots and Pat Boone—is responsible for the excited flutter here in spring. Every year on March 19, St. Joseph’s Day, tourists flock to town to welcome cliff swallows as they arrive from their annual 6,000-mile migration from Goya, Argentina.

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