Sarah Bohannon

Interim News Director

Sarah is one of the early birds of the NSPR team, hosting Morning Edition Monday through Wednesday. She grew up in the North State – in the small town of Biggs – before heading off to enjoy the beautiful beaches of Santa Cruz. After finishing her general education at Cabrillo College, Sarah attended Chico State. There she earned a degree in journalism and a minor in nutrition. During her time at the university, Sarah wrote for the college’s award-winning newspaper, the Orion. She also worked as both a news intern and the associate producer of the series “Reflections” at North State Public Radio. Sarah’s previous experience also includes two years working in multimedia at a local nonprofit, where she created educational materials about farming and nutrition. Along with being the station's interim news director, Sarah is the producer of the programs Cultivating Place, Up the Road and Common Ground for Common Good

Photo courtesy of Thomas Piper

In the global gardening world, Piet Oudolf is synonymous with a naturalistic planting style - rich in sweeps of grouped flowering perennials (often North American wildflower and prairie plants) and characterized by dramatic seasonal dynamics and ecological grounding . A new film "Five Seasons: The Gardens of Piet Oudolf" opens in New York this month celebrating this man and his work. On Cultivating Place this week, we learn more when we’re joined by filmmaker Thomas Piper. Join us.

Courtesy of Joan Didion's Facebook page

This week we appreciate New York-based writer and New Journalist Joan Didion, born and raised in Sacramento, the Big Tomato. Pioneer stock. Some of her people were part of the Donner Party, in fact—those who wisely turned north to Oregon instead of scaling the Sierra Nevada.

One of my favorite Didion books is Where I Was From, first published in 2003. Note, in the book title, that she was from here, from California, but that past tense suggests she no longer is. The physical facts of the matter haven’t changed—she was born in Sacramento, on December 5, 1938, and lived here for much of her life—but everything else has. I’m glad she took an entire book to explain. Didion’s voice in Where I Was From isn’t so different from that in her debut collection, Slouching Towards Bethlehem, also exploring California. But the perspective is.

Credit Photo used courtesy of Nancy Lawson

The Oxford English Dictionary defines the word Humane as this: Being characterized by consideration of other, compassionate. This week on Cultivating Place we’re joined by Nancy Lawson author of  – The Humane Gardener, Nurturing a Backyard Habitat for Wildlife. Join us! 

Steve Herring

The English-American poet and writer W.H. Auden was a big fan of M.F.K. Fisher, an American culinary icon. He called her called America’s “greatest writer.” In 1963 he also said, provocatively, “I do not know of anyone in the United States who writes better prose.” One of the first to engage food in all its variety as a cultural metaphor, Fisher knew she was the real thing. Further, she believed that writers are born, not created. Once, when asked by a young girl why “so-and-so’s” books were best-sellers while she was barely known, Fisher reportedly replied: “Because he is an author, and I am a writer.” Being a writer, however, didn’t spare her a lifetime of scrambling after book contracts and New Yorker magazine assignments. Everyone has to sing for their supper.

Photo courtesy of Southern Connecticut State University

Entryways of Civility, Pathways of Kindness: A Reflection and Social Justice Garden on the Campus of Southern Connecticut University in New Haven, CT. Originally conceived to celebrate the lives and lights of four women Alumnae of Southern Connecticut State University who were killed while trying to protect the students in their care during the course of the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, CT in 2012. In honor of the intentions of the upcoming Memorial Day weekend and the power of gardens to make the world a better place, we hear more about this new and powerful garden on Cultivating Place this week. Join us.

Unprecedented – Never to Happen Again. This Zen idiom refers specifically to the transient nature of time and each and every moment no matter how seemingly mundane. This sacredness in the everyday is at the heart of our Dispatches from the Home Garden this week when we visit an American tea garden in Tivoli, New York.  Join us!

Todd Lappin

 

This week we’re heading out to the 24 Hours of LeMons endurance car race at Thunderhill Raceway just west of Willows, a free-wheeling parody of France’s 24 Hours of LeMans. LeMons is best described as “the Burning Man of car races.” Just plain wrench-monkey fun, folks, with lots of NASA and sundry other engineers here, not to mention creative Silicon Valley computer jockeys. (Thunderhill is owned by San Francisco’s branch of the Sports Car Club of America, so how can you keep the city folks away?) On a good day, expect to see such things as flying pigs, backhoes, upside-down sports cars, and even the Starship Enterprise out there lapping the track.

 

 

Photo courtesy of Melody Overstreet

Art in the garden, art from the Garden – these are concepts familiar to most gardeners and yet for many of us also perhaps still largely unplumbed. This week, we visit with Iranian-American artist and plant person, Melody Overstreet to speak more about the culture of plant and land based art and the crafting of pigments, inks, dyes and watercolors.  Melody shares her cultural, artistic and plant based journey with grace and in a way that interweaves her art with her world view and ethics.

They are in your garden by the billions, they are in your food, in your house, and all over your skin. They partner us in all we do and they make all that we do well possible to start with. Listen in to this week's Cultivating Place, when we’re joined by science and food writer Eugenia Bone to talk more about her own foray into better understanding the world of the amazing and powerful world of Microbia. It’s a focus that is expanding for us all. 

 

The second best time to become a gardener and nature lover is right now.  The first best time, is as a child. This week on Cultivating Place, we’re joined by Nora McDonald and Katherine Somerville of the American Horticultural Society and by Fiona Doherty of Cornell University’s Horticulture Department and Garden Education. They talk with us about the history, impact of hopes of the American Horticultural Society’s Children & Youth Garden Symposium. This year’s symposium is being held in July at Cornell University in Ithaca, NY. Join us! 

 

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