Matt Fidler

Producer

Matt Fidler is a producer and sound designer with over 15 years’ experience producing nationally distributed public radio programs. He has worked for shows such as Freakonomics Radio, Selected Shorts, Studio 360, The New Yorker Radio Hour and The Takeaway. In 2017, Matt launched the language podcast Very Bad Words, hitting the #28 spot in the iTunes podcast charts.

NASA


Longtime listeners to Blue Dot know that Dave has a lifelong fascination with the Moon from its exploration to its role in eclipses. But how did our companion world come to be? 

 

Since the Apollo missions brought back lunar samples, the most accepted idea is called the "Giant Impact Hypothesis" but the notion has its flaws -- mainly that if a Mars-sized object actually did hit the Earth and create the Moon, where is the evidence in the Moon rocks which are isotopically identical to Earth's?

Amy Merrick

Since time immemorial flowers have accompanied humans on our journeys – this week Cultivating Place welcomes the divine Amy Merrick, writer, florist, international traveler, teacher, and a perennial student of all that flowers offer to us in the way of wonder and learning.

 

Her new book – On Flowers: Lessons from an Accidental Florist (Artisan Publishing, 2019) – is as humbly and accessibly luxurious as flowers themselves. Listen in!

Tom Hilton / Flickr

We continue visiting unique state parks this week, this time Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, north of Mexico, east of San Diego, and south of Palm Springs. Yep, that’s serious geography, some 600,000 acres. Just the place for a family timeout, to look up and take in the totality of that dark night sky.

Stargazing is a major reason to come. The community of Borrego Springs, a big donut hole of private land entirely surrounded by the park, is the first International Dark Sky Community in the U.S.—there are a few others now—official recognition of the town’s commitment to eliminate light pollution. Plan for stargazing and dark-sky events offered by the park and the natural history association.

Amazon


Ira Glass stops by to chat about a collection of short stories titled, The New Kings of Nonfiction. Also, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author, Edward Humes came to talk some trash about GARBOLOGY: Our Dirty Love Affair With Trash.

 

Johns Hopkins University

In this episode, inspired by our good friend Alan Stern, the Principal Investigator for the New Horizons Spacecraft, we examine a question that has vexed astronomers, planetary scientists and 5th graders, for decades: "What exactly is a Planet?" And more importantly, why should we care about definitions like this in science.

Ken Druse is a gardener and garden writer. This week on Cultivating Place Ken joins us to explore and revel in the scented Side of the garden - the topic of his 20th book The Scentual Garden, Exploring the World of Botanical Fragrance, out now. It’s perfect for winter dreaming, planning, and plotting. Join us!

Amazon

Author Lisa Benaron M.D. kicks-off the hour by providing a detailed and informative look at Autism spectrum disorder. 

 

Our second guest, Journalist Ethan Watters, explains how America categorizes disorders, thereby defining mental illness and health.

 

About Lisa Benaron MD: The author of Autism, she is a graduate of Yale Medical School and is board certified in Pediatrics, Internal Medicine and Neurodevelopmental Disabilities. She is the medical director of Far Northern Regional Center, where she provides evaluations for individuals of all ages suspected of having an ASD. 

Amazon

Poet Ingrid Keriotis shares her book of poetry, It Started with the Wild Horse. The collection of poems explores topics such as wildness and inspiration, love and memory, and family and motherhood. Also, author Robert Hart takes us on a spiritual awakening with Medicine Wheel: The Evolution of Consciousness.

Sasha Sagan


In this very special episode, Dave talks to the daughter of the man he likes to call "the patron saint of Blue Dot," Carl Sagan.

 

Sasha Sagan was only 14 when her father passed away in 1996 and his loss is central to the theme of her new book For Small Creatures Such As We: Rituals for Finding Meaning in Our Unlikely World

Lauren E. Oakes

Dr. Lauren E. Oakes is a conservation and adaptation scientist working to model and communicate how people can adapt at local levels to the GLOBAL climate crisis. Her book In Search of the Canary Tree: The Story of a Scientist, a Cypress and a Changing World is the chosen Book in Common for Chico and California State University, Chico this coming academic year. We revisit our BEST OF conversation with Lauren this week, sharing her journey story and other thoughts on resilience in our changing world, in advance of her appearing at CSU Chico this coming April. Listen in!

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