Matt Fidler

Producer

Matt Fidler is a producer and sound designer with over 15 years’ experience producing nationally distributed public radio programs. He has worked for shows such as Freakonomics Radio, Selected Shorts, Studio 360, The New Yorker Radio Hour and The Takeaway. In 2017, Matt launched the language podcast Very Bad Words, hitting the #28 spot in the iTunes podcast charts.

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On the anniversary of 9/11, Commentator Richard Parker has some thoughts about that event in US history.

 

In 2012 Chico Neurosurgeon Jeffrey Lobosky published It’s Enough to Make You Sick: The Failure of the American Health Care System and a Prescription for the Cure.   

 

Since then Dr. Lobosky has continued to research solutions and brings us an update.

Lassen Volcanic National Park is the latest addition to the University of California Natural Reserve System. The 41 units of the UCNRS represent virtually every ecosystem in this ecologically diverse state and make it the largest university affiliated preserve system in the world. 

Dave talks to UC Davis's Jeffrey Clary, who will be charged with administering the Lassen Field Station and park Superintendent Jim Richardson as they discuss how and why Lassen Park, one of the most scientifically valuable units in the National Park System, was chosen as a field site for UC researchers and their students.

"California Burning" Coming Sept 30

Sep 5, 2019

Natural disasters are increasing across the nation. In the West, these disasters often come in the form of wildfire, and perhaps no state understands the true cost of wildfire as California. While the Golden State has always had forest fires, these conflagrations are progressively becoming harder to control and more deadly. At the same time, California’s population has surpassed 40 million, pushing people further into wild spaces that have been adapted to fire.

Dr. Lauren E. Oakes is a conservation and adaptation scientist working to model and communicate how people can adapt at local levels to the GLOBAL climate crisis.

Her book In Search of the Canary Tree: the Story of a Scientist, a Cypress and a Changing World is the chosen Book in Common for Chico and California State University, Chico this coming academic year.

Lauren joins Cultivating Place this week to share her journey story and other thoughts on resilience in our changing world.

Bruce Fingerhood / Flickr Creative Commons

 

We head Up the Road this week into the heart of the State of Jefferson and its once—and possibly future—capital, Yreka, and then continue on toward Oregon. It’s a good trip, one to work up a plan for, given that far northern California and southern Oregon also comprise the State of Jefferson, which almost came to be in the 1940s.

There’s something profoundly different about a place proud to be in a constant state of rebellion. That place would be California, which has generated more than 200 different independence proposals since statehood in 1850. The first serious attempts to break away came from thoroughly dissed Los Angeles, still a dusty cow town when the streets of San Francisco were almost literally paved with gold, after the gold rush.

Butte College Anthropology instructor Mike Findlay is a scholar who has contributed to research in Asian-American culture and Mesoamerican Studies. He is the author of “A Survey of Language and Culture: Linguistic Anthropology and Cross-Cultural Communication,” which includes a chapter on taboo words.

The Native Seed Pod

As we head into the month of September, and we tend toward the Autumnal Equinox later in the month, I am reminded of this being one of the best seed seasons in our gardens and in our wildlands. 

Ecosystems everywhere in the Northern Hemisphere are reminded by the light of the need to set seed before growing season’s end. 

I thought this was a perfect moment to return to one of the episodes from our series last year entitled Seeds of September. Today Cultivating Place revisits our conversation with SeedKeeper, Indigenous woman, mother, writer and Seed Rematriator, Rowen White.

Darron Birgenheier / Flickr

“Lonely as God and white as a winter moon.” That’s how 19th-century writer Joaquin Miller described Mount Shasta, California’s most majestic mountain. So it still is.

Shasta is California’s fifth-highest peak but more impressive than any other—perpetually snow-covered, glowing orange, pink, and purple at sunset, casting shadows on the lava lands below. Sometimes clearly visible from as far away as 150 miles, close up Shasta is more obscure, mysterious.

Chico State / Flickr


Joe Wills served as spokesman for Chico State University as director of Public Affairs from 1997 until he retired in 2016.

 

He now is a licensed marriage and family therapist, and has written a story collection.

 

“Fables That Found Me: Tales of Torment and Healing from Soul (or Some Other Place)” is a collection of stories that blends magical realism with the experiences of obsession, loss, and renewal.


We examine the complex series of fault ruptures and earthquakes that struck near Ridgecrest in Southern California over the July 4 weekend of 2019. A 6.4 magnitude temblor on the evening of July 4 was followed by in even bigger magnitude 7.1 event just over 24 hours later that may have been triggered in a process called cross faulting during the earlier quake.

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