Sarah Bohannon

News Director

Sarah Bohannon is the News Director of North State Public Radio. She was previously the station’s Morning Edition host and a reporter. She's also produced many of NSPR's programs and podcasts including: After Paradise, a National Edward R. Murrow Award-winning program about post-Camp Fire recovery; California Burning, a five-part series looking into the history and solutions of catastrophic wildfires in California; Cultivating Place; Up The Road; and Common Ground for Common Good. Sarah was raised in Butte County. She holds a B.A. in Journalism from California State University, Chico. 


In this episode of “After Paradise,” we commemorate the year anniversary of the Camp Fire by focusing on where we are now, 364 days after the fire. We’ll hear from those working in mental health about how the one year mark is triggering stress and anxiety for many in the community, and about practical ways to manage. We’ll hear about recovery from survivors living in communities all over the Camp Fire burn scar. And we’ll visit with a few people providing a message of hope. It’s been a long road, and it may not feel like it now, but we can turn the challenges and devastation of this disaster into Post Traumatic growth. 

 

Noah Berger / AP Photo

  

After a disaster like last year’s Camp Fire, many people struggle with distress, depression and anxiety. These feelings are normal and help is available.

Resources and advice for helping you cope can be found at buttecountyrecovers.org, and below. 

General Advice

James Lewis

 

Smokey Bear is arguably the most effective advertising campaign in American history—but Smokey’s message created a fear in many of us that’s led to a misunderstanding of fire.

In this first episode of California Burning, we explore what Smokey got wrong, and we learn how a series of unprecedented wildfires in the early twentieth-century started forest management policies that have contributed to the catastrophic wildfires we’re experiencing today.

Matt Fidler

Native Californians used fire to maintain the forests that surrounded them for more than 14,000 years. This prevented future wildfires and supported many plants and animals that need fire to thrive. On the second episode of California Burning, Matt shadows a pyrogeographer and learns how the Yurok Tribe on the Klamath River and the Amah Mutsun Tribal Band of Santa Cruz are bringing fire back to the land.

California Burning: Episode 3—One Foot In The Black

Sep 29, 2019
Matt Fidler

Fire behavior is complicated, but can often be predicted. On the third episode of California Burning, we dive into the science of fire by visiting a wildland fire lab and a sustainable timber operation. We also hear from firefighters, forest rangers, and the “Helltown Hotshots” who risked it all to save their town during the Camp Fire.

Matt Fidler

 

Wildfires are no longer isolated to our forests in California. They now also threaten our cities. On the fourth episode of California Burning, we focus on where urban and wild spaces meet and hear from people who have experienced some of the most tragic fires in California’s history.

Matt Fidler

 

How can we address all the different factors associated with the wildfires plaguing California? On the fifth and final episode of California Burning, we seek solutions. We learn about alternative building materials that can withstand fire, and we go to a fire-resistant house that was the only in its neighborhood to survive the 2018 Carr Fire.  

Natural disasters are increasing across the nation. In the West, these disasters often come in the form of wildfire, and perhaps no state understands the true cost of wildfire as California. While the Golden State has always had forest fires, these conflagrations are progressively becoming harder to control and more deadly. At the same time, California’s population has surpassed 40 million, pushing people further into wild spaces that have been adapted to fire.

Cal Fire SHU / Twitter

A fire in Shasta County that prompted evacuations and road closures in the community of Jones Valley northeast of Redding Thursday remains at 600 acres and is now 40 percent contained, according to a Cal Fire briefing held at the Shasta District Fairgrounds in Anderson earlier Friday morning. 

Although firefighters have started containing the Mountain Fire, Cal Fire officials reminded crews going into the field that the blaze is burning in an area that has been historically challenging for the unit. They said priorities include buttoning up the northwest side of the fire, finishing mopping up hotspots and staying safe.

“We have an apparent amount of snags, steep slopes, shifting winds today, spot fires, there could be insects and snakes,” an official said.

Firefighters will be working in 105 degree heat with changing winds.

AlertWildfire.org

Updated at 6:40 p.m. 

Evacuations and road closures remain in place, but Cal Fire is reporting officials are starting to get a handle on the Mountain Fire. 

It’s currently 820 acres in size, according to the Redding Record Searchlight. 

The blaze was moving quickly earlier today, at one point, doubling in size in an hour, but according to Cal Fire Public Information Officer Robert Foxworthy the winds fanning the flames have subsided. He said, even so, it’s important that residents stay vigilant.

“There’s always a chance that we could have to expand the evacuation zone, just due to the fact that the fire isn’t completely extinguished and it’s still burning,” Foxworthy said.

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