Sarah Bohannon

Interim News Director

Sarah is one of the early birds of the NSPR team, hosting Morning Edition. She grew up in the North State – in the small town of Biggs – before heading off to enjoy the beautiful beaches of Santa Cruz. After finishing her general education at Cabrillo College, Sarah attended Chico State. There she earned a degree in journalism and a minor in nutrition. During her time at the university, Sarah wrote for the college’s award-winning newspaper, the Orion. She also worked as both a news intern and the associate producer of the series “Reflections” at North State Public Radio. Sarah’s previous experience also includes two years working in multimedia at a local nonprofit, where she created educational materials about farming and nutrition. Along with being the station's interim news director, Sarah is the producer of the programs Cultivating Place, Up the Road and Common Ground for Common Good

Sharon Mollerus

We visit Mission San Juan Capistrano this week, the seventh California mission, first claimed by Spain in 1775 but officially founded in November of 1776. It’s still a bit hard to believe that a schmaltzy 1939 song by Leon René, When the Swallows Come Back to Capistrano—recorded by everyone from Gene Autry and Glenn Miller to the Ink Spots and Pat Boone—is responsible for the excited flutter here in spring. Every year on March 19, St. Joseph’s Day, tourists flock to town to welcome cliff swallows as they arrive from their annual 6,000-mile migration from Goya, Argentina.

Image courtesy of Ira Wallace

This week on Cultivating Place, the second installment in the Seeds of September four part series – when we’re joined by plantswoman, seed advocate, farmer and author Ira Wallace of the Southern Exposure Seed Exchange and the Heritage Harvest Festival in Charlottesville, VA Sept 20 – 22. Join us!

Ken Lund

We head up the road this week to Mission Santa Barbara, “Queen of the Missions.” Not only did Saint Barbara lend her name to the city, her namesake mission generously shared what we now recognize as Santa Barbara style. This was the social capital of Alta California, even when Monterey was its political capital. But the presidio came first, in 1782, and the mission, California’s tenth, was built four years later.

Marc Albert

 

This story was last updated on 9/7/18 at 9:02 a.m. 

The Delta Fire continues to grow. As of Friday morning it was 24,558 acres in size and zero percent contained.  According to the U.S. Forest Service, numerous structures are threatened and evacuation orders and warnings remain for parts of Shasta, Siskiyou and Trinity counties. The largest city under immediate threat is Dunsmuir which is under an evacuation warning. NSPR’s Marc Albert ventured through the smoke to Dunsmuir yesterday. He said residents displayed a range of emotions. Longtime resident Curtis Smith said this year’s fires have been the worst in his lifetime. 

Image used courtesy of Jere Gettle

Welcome to The Seeds of September – this week on Cultivating Place we kick off our four-part series in conversation with Jere Gettle of Baker Creek Seeds, and more from the Organic Seed Alliance and Redwood Seeds. I think you’re going to love it! 

For photos visit cultivatingplace.com. The show is available as a podcast on SoundCloudiTunesGoogle Play and Stitcher

Prayitno

This week we stop off in once-sleepy San Miguel, a spot in the road just north of Paso Robles, not quite so sleepy now that Central Coast wineries have attracted fame, fortunes, and the fortunate.

 

Centerpiece of the tiny town is Mission San Miguel Arcàngel, 16th of California’s 21 missions, originally built in 1797 and still an active parish church. The mission has been brought low before, by fire or earthquakes and their aftermath—and early on, first in 1806. The rebuilt church, with tiled, not thatched roofs this time, rising again in 1821. As an agricultural enterprise Mission San Miguel was immensely successful, like others in the area. Its holdings extended 18 miles to the south, 18 miles to the north, 66 miles to the east, into and across the great Central Valley, and 35 miles west, to the Pacific Ocean.

stnorbert / Flickr, Creative Commons

A bill sitting on Governor Jerry Brown’s desk attempts to address the long waits faced by students for counseling. If approved, Senate Bill 968 would require each University of California and California State University campus to have the equivalent of one, full time ‘mental health counselor’ for every 1,500 students.

Language in the bill claims one in four students has a diagnosable mental illness and that only 60 percent of students seek care.

Image used courtesy of Eugenia Bone

They are in your garden by the billions, they are in your food, in your house, and all over your skin. They partner us in all we do and they make all that we do well possible to start with. This week on Cultivating Place we revisit a conversation with science and food writer Eugenia Bone to talk more about her own foray into better understanding the world of the amazing and powerful world of Microbia. It’s a focus that is expanding for us all. 

For photos visit cultivatingplace.com. The show is available as a podcast on SoundCloudiTunesGoogle Play and Stitcher

The right tools can make all the difference in our lives and in our work. This is as true in gardening as in all other aspects of life. This week on Cultivating Place we revisit a conversation with Dorian Winslow, president of Womanswork. Almost 33 years ago now, Womanswork introduced the first work and garden gloves designed specifically for women. Join us! 

Anita Ritenour

The largest mission complex in the state, now situated on 1,000 unspoiled acres just east of Lompoc, Misión de la Concepción Purísima de María Santísima (“Mission of the Immaculate Conception of Most Holy Mary”) once covered some 470 square miles. La Purísima was the 11th in California’s chain of coastal missions when it was built in what is now downtown Lompoc in 1787. Almost all of the original Mission La Purísima was destroyed just before Christmas Day in 1812 by a devastating earthquake and deluge. Another traumatic year was 1824, when rebellious Chumash, angry at their exploitation by soldiers, captured the mission and held it for a month. Ten years later, the mission was essentially abandoned, after secularization.

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