Sarah Bohannon

Interim News Director

Sarah is one of the early birds of the NSPR team, hosting Morning Edition. She grew up in the North State – in the small town of Biggs – before heading off to enjoy the beautiful beaches of Santa Cruz. After finishing her general education at Cabrillo College, Sarah attended Chico State. There she earned a degree in journalism and a minor in nutrition. During her time at the university, Sarah wrote for the college’s award-winning newspaper, the Orion. She also worked as both a news intern and the associate producer of the series “Reflections” at North State Public Radio. Sarah’s previous experience also includes two years working in multimedia at a local nonprofit, where she created educational materials about farming and nutrition. Along with being the station's interim news director, Sarah is the producer of the programs Cultivating Place, Up the Road and Common Ground for Common Good

The garden is a full contact playground engaging us at all levels: We can hear, we can taste, we can see and smell - touch and feel. Tovah Martin is gardener and garden writer who explores the truth and the manifold joys of this truth in her new book “The Garden in Every Sense and Season” out now from Timber Press. Tovah joins us this week on Cultivating Place to share more. Listen in!

For photos visit cultivatingplace.com. The show is available as a podcast on SoundCloudiTunesGoogle Play and Stitcher

The New England Wild Flower Society is one of the oldest native plant conservation organizations in the country and represents the New England states. Their new book Native Plants for the New England Gardens is a perfect reference for their ecological and pollinator garden workshops being held across New England this summer. On Cultivating Place this week, we learn more. Join us!

For photos visit cultivatingplace.com. The show is available as a podcast on SoundCloudiTunesGoogle Play and Stitcher

Robert Freiberger

Europeans generally get credit for having “discovered” America, including the mythic land of California, though of course the people already here didn’t realize they were lost, or otherwise in need of finding. But there are claims that the Chinese discovered the Americas, often derided. According to one story, a storm-tossed Chinese ship—misdirected by its own compass, after a cockroach got wedged under the needle—sailed stubbornly for 100 days toward what was supposed to be mainland China. (The navigator reportedly ignored the crew, who pointed out that the sun was setting on the wrong horizon.) These unwitting adventurers finally reached land, and reported stepping out into towering forests surrounding an almost endless inlet, and meeting with red-skinned peoples amid giant red-barked trees. California, right?

Photo used courtesy of Beth Chatto Gardens

In May of this year, the gardening world – specifically the ecologically based gardening world – lost one of it’s great leaders, Beth Chatto. This August her gardens and educational trust are hosting a symposium to honor her life and her work. On Cultivating Place this week we hear more about the woman and her legacy – join us!

For photos visit cultivatingplace.com. The show is available as a podcast on SoundCloudiTunesGoogle Play and Stitcher

Courtesy of Visit California


If you’re a Californian you’ve probably had the experience of touching down elsewhere in this vast wonderland—somewhere in the Midwest, say, where tornados regularly tear things up, or on the Eastern Seaboard, famous for hurricanes—and the first thing people want to know is, how you live with all those earthquakes. How do you stand it? How do you live with the fear? If you’re like me, you don’t know what to say. Because you’re not that afraid. You haven’t personally experienced a major earthquake.

Jennifer Jewell

This week we’re joined by two native plantspeople – Julie Nelson and Michael Kauffmann - to delve into the unsettling case of the poached Dudleya this last year here in California – j oin us as we explore the interesting, sometimes bothersome issues an incident like this brings up for us gardeners. 

For photos visit cultivatingplace.com. The show is available as a podcast on SoundCloudiTunesGoogle Play and Stitcher

Prayitno

  

Think July 4, 1776, Independence Day for the United States, and sights and sounds crowd the imagination—the Liberty Bell, American flag, George Washington, fifes and drums, smoking muskets, and fireworks. Red, white, and blue, rat-a-tat-tat. Clear across the continent, colonial life in California—with its missions and modest military outposts—was just beginning. It would be almost 75 years before California would join the first and subsequent United States, as the 31st state in the union. But foreign exploration had been underway since at least 1543, when Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo and his men rode at anchor in San Diego Bay.

Photo used courtesy of U.S. Botanic Garden

In preparation for the 4th of July holiday, this week we visit our nation’s capital and the U.S. Botanic Garden. We’re joined by Devin Dotson, exhibits specialist and Nekisha Durrett, a featured artist in an epic summer mural exhibit at the Garden - join us! 

David Yu

As we mentioned earlier, California has had a surprising number of capital cities—starting with Monterey. Even Santa Barbara, if you want to consider Spanish California’s cultural if not legislative capital. California became a state of these United States in 1849 with a quick succession of American capitals: San Jose, then Vallejo, then Benicia, and then Sacramento, which has remained California’s capital city ever since, not counting a brief move to San Francisco during the floods of 1862. 

The lights are out for about 10,000 Pacific Gas and Electric Company customers in Chico, Redding and Red Bluff.

PG&E spokesperson Melissa Subbotin said Saturday evening that the power outages were due to a request from Cal Fire and to fire burning and damaging the utility’s equipment.

Safety patrols must be done before power can be restored. Power may not be turned back on for many customers until Sunday, Subbotin said.  

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