Sunday Puzzle: Low And Inside

Aug 23, 2020

On-air challenge: Today's puzzle is titled "Low and Inside." Every answer is a word or name that has the syllable "low" somewhere inside it (not at the start or the end). The "low" syllable is always accented.

Example: Like the U.S. before 1776 >> COLONIAL

1. Greeting in Hawaii

2. House speaker Nancy

3. Tennis star Martina

4. Spanish city that hosted the 1992 Olympics

5. Powerful land in ancient Mesopotamia

6. Everyday sandwich meat

7. Sounding pleasant to the ear, as music

8. Informal, as speech

9. Religious scholar

10. Kind of tube that a fertilized egg passes through

11. Relating to or involved in crime

12. Running away to get married

Last week's challenge: Think of a major city in France whose name is an anagram of a major city in Italy. Each city has more than 100,000 people.

Challenge answer: Orléans and Salerno

Winner: Ben Bernard of Cliff Island, Maine

This week's challenge: This week's challenge comes from listener Sandy Weisz, of Chicago. Think of a place on earth with a four-word name. Take the third word. Advance three of its letters to the next letter of the alphabet (so A would become B, B would be come C, etc.). You'll get the fourth word in the name. What place is this?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you by Thursday, August 27, at 3 p.m. ET.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

It's time to play The Puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Joining us is Will Shortz. He's puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster.

Hi, Will.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Hey there, Lulu.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So what was last week's challenge?

SHORTZ: Yes. I said, think of a major city in France whose name is an anagram of a major city in Italy. And I said each city has more than 100,000 people. The answer is Orleans - O-R-L-E-A-N-S - and Salerno.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: We received more than 1,300 correct responses, and the winner this week is Ben Bernard of Cliff Island, Maine.

Congratulations.

BEN BERNARD: Thank you.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: How did you figure it out?

BERNARD: Well, it was a family effort. We were bouncing cities of Italy and France off each other. And the exact pattern's lost to memory, but one of us said Salerno, and somebody else said Orleans. We put them together.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So I understand that you have some guests with you there (laughter).

BERNARD: My wife, Victoria (ph), and my daughter Ellen (ph) and my son Julian (ph) are all gathered around.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1: Hi.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #2: Hello.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Hi (laughter). And you guys play The Puzzle together.

BERNARD: We do.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Tell me about your Sunday ritual.

BERNARD: Well, we've been trying to catch The Puzzle together every Sunday morning for as long as I can remember. We don't always manage. Sometimes we oversleep. But...

GARCIA-NAVARRO: (Laughter).

BERNARD: ...It's one of our favorite things to do.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Oh, well, that's wonderful. Well, welcome to you all. And you're going to play now with Will. So, Will, take it away.

SHORTZ: All right. Ben, today's puzzle is called Low and Inside. Every answer is a word or name that has the syllable low somewhere inside it - not at the start or the end - and the low syllable is always accented. For example, if I said like the U.S. before 1776, you would say colonial.

BERNARD: OK.

SHORTZ: OK. Number one is greeting in Hawaii.

BERNARD: Aloha.

SHORTZ: That is it. Number two - House Speaker Nancy.

BERNARD: Pelosi.

SHORTZ: Tennis star Martina.

BERNARD: Navratilova.

SHORTZ: Yes. Spanish city that hosted the 1992 Olympics. It's the second-largest city of Spain.

BERNARD: Barcelona.

SHORTZ: That's it. Powerful land in ancient Mesopotamia.

BERNARD: That one's not coming to me.

SHORTZ: What if I told you it starts with a B?

GARCIA-NAVARRO: And it is where modern Iraq is.

BERNARD: Babylon.

SHORTZ: That - and what's - that's the city. What's the land?

BERNARD: Babylonia.

SHORTZ: That's it - Babylonia. Everyday sandwich meat.

BERNARD: Bologna.

SHORTZ: Sounding pleasant to the ear, as music.

BERNARD: Melodious.

SHORTZ: Good. Informal, as speech.

BERNARD: Colloquial.

SHORTZ: Good. Religious scholar.

BERNARD: Theologian.

SHORTZ: Theologian is it. Kind of tube that a fertilized egg passes through.

BERNARD: Fallopian.

SHORTZ: Good. Relating to or involved in crime.

BERNARD: Felonious.

SHORTZ: Nice. Your last one - it's going fast - running away to get married.

BERNARD: Eloping.

SHORTZ: Bingo.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: You did amazing. How do you feel?

BERNARD: Very relieved.

(LAUGHTER)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right. Well, let's hear from your family. How do you think he did?

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #3: Really well. Yay.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Yay (laughter).

BERNARD: They only had to mime three answers to me.

(LAUGHTER)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right. Well, for playing our puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin, as well as puzzle books and games. You can read all about it at npr.org/puzzle. And, Ben, which member station do you listen to?

BERNARD: WMEA in Portland.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: That's Ben Bernard of Cliff Island, Maine.

Thank you so much for playing The Puzzle.

BERNARD: Thank you.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right, Will. What's next week's challenge?

SHORTZ: Yeah, it comes from listener Sandy Weisz of Chicago. Think of a place on Earth with a four-word name. Take the third word. Advance three of its letters to the next letter of the alphabet - so A would become B, B would become C, et cetera. You'll get the fourth word in the name. What place is this? So again, a place on Earth, has a four-word name. Take the third word. Move three of its letters to the next letter of the alphabet. You'll get the fourth word in the name. What place is this?

GARCIA-NAVARRO: When you have the answer, go to our website, npr.org/puzzle, and click on the submit your answer link. Remember, just one entry per person, please. Our deadline for entries is Thursday, August 27, at 3 p.m. Eastern. Include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. And if you're the winner, we'll give you a call, and you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's very own puzzlemaster, Will Shortz.

Thanks so much, Will.

SHORTZ: Thank you, Lulu.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.