After Paradise

6:30 p.m. Thursdays

“After Paradise” is dedicated to post-Camp Fire recovery information. Each Thursday night, the NSPR News Team will bring you the latest from government officials, rescue organizations, financial planners, trauma experts and local reporters.

What do YOU need to know ?If you have questions about Camp Fire recovery ask them by using the form below.

Tonight on After Paradise, it’s been 19 weeks since the Camp Fire started. New water contamination warnings raises more questions and concerns. Evacuees with few housing options were promised modular homes by the federal government, but three and a half months after the fire, is the progress only on paper? 

Tonight on After Paradise, it’s been 18 weeks since the Camp Fire started. Tonight on “After Paradise” we hear about a new case management program in Butte County that’s helping connect Camp Fire survivors to resources they still need four months after the fire, we hear from two women who have returned to Paradise about what their lives are like living in a town of rubble with few others in it and we go to Magalia to learn how the Butte County Fire Safe Council is working to prevent fires from happening in the area in the future.  

Matt Fidler

These are some of the sounds of a forest thinning operation around the Paradise Pines Property Owners Association in Magalia.

Chipping up woody material removed from the forest and left on the ground as mulch. The goal is to return the forest’s condition to one that more resembles the forests that John Bidwell knew.

Ashley Bailey

Emily Holtom is a stay-at-home mom and owns one of the rare houses in Paradise that is still standing after the Camp Fire.

 

She, her husband, Spencer, their six kids and dog just moved here about nine months ago from Southern California for Spencer's job.

 

Ashley Bailey

Peggy Beltran grew up in Paradise and her house is among the scattered homes that were spared by the Camp Fire.

She and her husband, Eddie, her parents and aunt were able to move back to the house a couple weeks after the fire.

Peggy is a respiratory therapist and a clinical instructor at Butte College.

 

Noah Berger / AP Photo

More than four months after the Camp Fire, resources that were immediately available almost seem to be gone. Volunteers are few. Donations have slowed. Shelters and Disaster Recovery Centers have shuttered. But there is help out there if you need it. That’s the bottom line.

After Paradise: Week 17

Mar 7, 2019


Tonight on After Paradise, it’s been 17 weeks since the Camp Fire started. In this episode we hear from those determined to return to Paradise that hold the first building permits that have been issued in the town, and we hear from a veterinarian who was on the front lines helping save animals after the Camp Fire erupted. We also talk to Meredith Cooper, managing editor at the Chico News & Review about her recent story on the widespread contamination in Paradise’s water system.  


Tonight on After Paradise – it’s been 16 weeks since the Camp Fire started. In this episode we hear the latest news on PG&E, we learn that the camping ban in Paradise isn’t being enforced and we take a journey to Butte Creek Canyon – a place where land practices of the past played a role in how much of that area was destroyed by the Camp Fire.

Your questions answered: Listener Don asked for an update of the status of water conditions in Paradise, which you can find here. We also were able to find an answer for Gregory who wanted to know “When will we be able to move back to Paradise? I know it’s going to take time. Just looking for a realistic time frame.”

 

Noah Berger / AP Photo

After Paradise: This Week’s Headlines

 

  • Alternative Debris Removal Program Deadline Extended

Noah Berger / AP Photo

California has continuously been seeing hotter, faster wildfires. But why? Well, a big contributing factor is our relationship with the land. Independent Producer Matt Fidler takes us to Butte Creek Canyon, one of the communities devastated by the Camp Fire where he explores how land practices of the past played a role in what happened there in November.

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