Up The Road

Wednesdays at 4:44 and 6:44 p.m. and Thursdays at 6:45 and 7:45 a.m.
  • Hosted by Kim Weir

A production of NSPR

Produced by Matt Fidler 

About Up the Road

If you travel mostly to escape the daily drudge, Up the Road host Kim Weir suggests you think again. Travel matters, every bit as much as other choices you make every day. Which is why Up the Road encourages everyone to travel responsibly. Here in California as elsewhere around the world, responsible travel means appreciating nature, valuing natural resources, respecting and preserving culture and history, and supporting local economies in healthy ways.

Up the Road is dedicated to responsible California travel—to sustaining the California story by deepening your connection to this unusual and surprising place. Each week Up the Road shares stories about the land, its natural history, and its people, the lives they have lived, the stories they have told over the centuries, and the stories they are creating right now. The stories that keep us all here, that create California’s unique ecology of home.

Host Kim Weir is editor and founder of Up the Road, a nonprofit public-interest journalism project dedicated to sustaining the California story. She is also a member of the Society of American Travel Writers, and author of all of the original California “handbooks” put out by Moon Publications, now Avalon Travel. Weir lives in Paradise, California.

Up the Road is a joint production of Up the Road and North State Public Radio, initially produced by Sarah Bohannon. The show is now produced by Matt Fidler and distributed by PRX. Up the Road’s theme song was written and produced by Kirk Williams.

 

Up The Road: Wildflower Century

Apr 20, 2016
Photo used courtesy of Chico Velo

When John Muir wandered west out of the Sierra Nevada in the late 1800s, he was overwhelmed by California's great central valley. “When California was wild,” he wrote, “it was one sweet bee garden throughout its entire length . . . so marvelously rich that, in walking from one end of it to the other, a distance of more than four hundred miles, your foot would press about a hundred flowers at every step.”

Up The Road: Wild Horse Sanctuary

Apr 13, 2016
Katey Barrett / Photo courtesy of the Wild Horse Sanctuary

Horses originated here in North America. Prehistoric ancestors of today’s equines migrated to Europe, Asia, and Africa but were frozen out here by the last ice age. Then horses came back: The thundering herds of old Westerns first escaped from Spanish explorers and soldiers.

rubengarciajrphotography / Flickr: http://bit.ly/1PKK2mI

Most of us don’t think of “travel” as history. We probably don’t think much about travel at all. When it’s time to take a break from the dailiness of life, we line up some time off, grab the credit card, and go.

But travel is history, and that history suggests that how we travel matters.

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