Weekend Edition Sunday

Sunday at 7 a.m.
  • Hosted by Lulu Garcia-Navarro

Hosted by Lulu Garcia-Navarro, Weekend Edition Sunday features interviews with newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicians, musicians, writers, theologians and historians. Every week listeners tune in to hear a unique blend of news, features and the regularly scheduled puzzle segment with Puzzlemaster Will Shortz, the crossword puzzle editor of The New York Times.

Sheldon Yett is UNICEF's lead man in Liberia. Over a long career he's been in the thick of all sorts of crises — wars, earthquakes, epidemics. He's seen firsthand how, when disaster strikes a poor country, aid workers and experts from all over the world flood the zone.

But with the Ebola epidemic, almost no one is answering the call.

"I'm astounded by how difficult it has been to get the partners we need," Yett says. "People are afraid. I can't convince my own staff to come. It's extremely, extremely difficult. We need skilled, qualified people here."

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When Darnell Moore was a teenager in the late 1980s, living in Camden, N.J., he didn't know he was gay — but he did know he was an outcast.

"At 13 I was a nerd," Moore tells his friend Bryan Epps, during a visit to StoryCorps OutLoud in New York. "I took such great pride in wearing dress pants and button-up shirts, unfortunate white socks like I was a preacher."

"My grandmother would send us to the store, and I hated going to the store because I know that somewhere between my grandmama's house and the store there would be somebody wanting to pick on me for some reason."

Fifty years ago this summer — a half-century before the protests in Ferguson, Mo. — riots broke out in seven cities in New York, New Jersey, Illinois and Pennsylvania, sparked by confrontations between black residents and their predominantly white police forces.

In Philadelphia, the violence began after dark, in late August.

"It was a hot day and just wasn't too much activity in the hood, as they say," remembers Kenneth Salaam, who was 15 years old in 1964.

On-air challenge: Every answer is a made-up, two-word phrase, in which the first word has 5 letters. Drop its last letter and read the remaining 4 letters backward, and you'll get the second word of the phrase.

Example: A Scrabble piece used by a select group of people = ELITE TILE

Last week's challenge from American puzzlemaker Sam Lloyd: You have a target with six rings, bearing the numbers 16, 17, 23, 24, 39 and 40. How can you score exactly 100 points, by shooting at the target?

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Now that rousing song was not written by BJ Liederman, but he did write our theme music. Still it's good to hear this because the drum line means that Mike Pesca, host of The Gist podcast from slate.com, is here to talk sports. Mike, hi.

The Threshold Choir brings music to those on the threshold of life — people who are dying. The first group started about a decade and a half ago. Now there are choirs in 120 cities, and even a few countries.

One of the newer chapters is in Nashville. On a recent day, Tammy Heinsohn and two other choir members were going room to room at a hospice there, introducing themselves and offering to sing some lullabies.

They waited at one doorway until 86-year-old Avis Moni told them to come in, then walked to her bedside and began singing.

A Video Game Tribute To Robin Williams

Aug 17, 2014

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(SOUNDBITE OF COMMERCIAL)

ZELDA WILLIAMS: Stop stealing my rubies.

ROBIN WILLIAMS: They're mine now - mine.

Z. WILLIAMS: It is not over yet.

R. WILLIAMS: What move was that? Oh, don't do that. No, no, no.

Z. WILLIAMS: It's over. You lose.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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