Chico CA

A Chico man has tested positive for COVID-19.

The announcement was made Saturday afternoon by Butte County Public Health Officer Dr. Andy Miller at a breaking news press conference in Oroville.

The pronouncement marks the first positive lab-confirmed case of the virus in Butte County.  

“It’s still unknown how the person contracted the virus and an investigation is ongoing,” Miller said.  

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A stalled plan to link two Butte County water purveyors received new life today.

 

Along with all the other problems, the Paradise Irrigation District—the entity providing drinking water to much of the area consumed by the 2018 Camp Fire—is facing a financial doozy. 

City Council Agenda Report


One of the final opportunities to critique proposed council districts in Chico is happening Tuesday evening.

 

Six different proposals would divide Chico into seven city council districts, eliminating the current method where voters select all councilors city wide.  

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Facing bankruptcy just a few years ago, Chico suddenly finds itself with $8 million in unspent money. But according to City Manager Mark Orme, it’s doubtful the windfall will bring any substantial differences.

 

Though the amount is equivalent to 16 percent of the city’s general fund, cuts to city services and departments have been so severe over the years that in terms of unaddressed needs Orme said: “I’ve got a list longer than Santa Claus’ list.”

GetJerry.com

Reimbursement for road repairs, a proposed parks parcel tax and library hours are up for discussion in Oroville this morning where the Butte County Board of Supervisors is set to meet.

 

The county received $12 million of the $14 million it was seeking to cover damage and wear and tear done to area roads during and after the 2017 Oroville Dam emergency.

 

Heavy equipment and convoys of dump trucks repairing the dam’s crippled spillways damaged area roads. The county is earmarking a million of the money for other dam emergency-related expenses, leaving $11 million for roads.

Alan Cuevas

 


 

The stock answer many panhandlers hear is ‘get a job.’ In a few cities around the nation, giving short-term jobs to some homeless people who want them, has been praised as a success and one of many answers to a multifaceted problem.

 

Chico City Councilman Scott Huber is requesting his city explore such a program, modeled after one initiated several years ago in Albuquerque New Mexico. I sat down with councilman Huber Monday, asking him first about the proposal’s appeal.  

Eric Risberg / AP Photo

Officials in Chico tonight will weigh a plan that would change local residents’ relationship with Pacific Gas & Electric Company. 

 

Used in a few other California cities, ‘Community Choice Aggregation’ creates a new body that would buy electricity from producers. It would still be delivered by PG&E. Currently, PG&E buys electricity from power plant owners and distributes it. 

Suzi Rosenberg

The soaring costs and dwindling supply of housing will be front and center at an official city meeting in Chico today.  

 

Several council members serving on a temporary committee will hear presentations from developers about some of the things, beyond labor and materials that go into the cost of a home.  

Silver Dollar Fairgrounds


 

 

As many as 1,800 people suffering from toothaches, cavities or more serious issues are expected to seek dental and medical services this weekend at the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds in Chico, where a kind of large scale pop-up free clinic will treat patients free of charge.

 

Operated by California CareForce and made possible by grants, charitable contributions and free labor from dentists, dental hygienists and other medical professionals, the pop-up clinic appears in a different community around the state each month.

VisitingCalifornia.com

Officials are working on new procedures after dozens of prized valley oaks were mistakenly chopped down in Bidwell Park last week. 

 

Erik Gustafson, City of Chico Public Works Director for Operations and Maintenance, described a “series of miscommunications” involving an inmate tree crew contracted to remove a stand of damaged Catalpa trees.