features

Julia Maldonado

California Park is a large area in Chico filled with almost 2,000 condominiums, houses and apartments. It’s located on the east side of the city, just off Deer Creek Highway and Bruce Road. The area has an abundance of wildlife; the geese can be seen flying above the ponds and lake that only Cal Park residents can access.

Listener Mandy Irwin submitted a question to North State Public Radio about the history of neighborhood. Specifically she wanted to know when the lake was built, whether or not it was originally a wetland and why developers created Cal Park in the first place.

 

Evacuees Remain At Walmart, But For How Long?

Nov 29, 2018
Corinne Smith

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Now the third week since the disaster of the Camp Fire, most evacuees who didn’t have anywhere to go have been consolidated into two county-coordinated shelters. Some still remain in pop-up shelters or some still at the Walmart in Chico. There people are sheltering from the weather in tents in a field and in cars and RVs in the parking lot.

 

Marooned In Helltown

Nov 27, 2018
Marc Albert

 

 

 


Aside from the distant whir of chainsaws, Coral and Doug Love’s neighborhood was awfully quiet Sunday. The Loves were doing rounds of sorts, making sure everyone had plenty to eat. 

 

“For all we know, we’re feeding other wildlife too,” Coral said while putting some food down for the cats the two have been feeding.  

 

“So, check this out, the firefighters also fed cats and left nice notes: ‘Hope you don’t mind, we fed your cats,’” Doug added.  

 

Chico State has been closed to most since the Camp Fire started on Nov. 8. Classes are set to resume at the university on Monday, Nov. 26th. NSPR’s Sarah Bohannon sat down with Chico State President Gayle Hutchinson on Tuesday to check in on Chico State’s current state of recovery.

Rich Pedroncelli / AP Photo

 

Firefighters battling the Camp Fire are set to receive some major help as soon as Wednesday; five of inches of rain is expected Wednesday morning through Sunday. While the rain will help with fire containment, it's also problematic for evacuees, many still living outside in encampments, and for those still searching for human remains. The rain will also bring about environmental issues. Once rained upon, the debris and ash of an entire town is expected to be turned into a toxic stew that will from the foothills down into the area's watersheds. 

Marc Albert

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Coleman National Fish Hatchery is where the timeless majesty of nature collides with industrial efficiency. Rather than a remote high country stream or a bear’s mouth, the lives of thousands of salmon following an epic migration end in this small warehouse-like building. Fighting through the last barrier, these burly kings or Chinook salmon flop into a tub, splashing and writhing until carbon dioxide pumped into the tank sort of stuns them.

Andrew Baumgartner

 

 

 

Not many people in Chico are aware of the small area of trees and grass called Mercer Grove that’s located off of East 10th Avenue and East Lindo Avenue. It's a place that can actually be seen perfectly well from Mangrove Avenue, if you know where to look. 

 

 

U.S. Department of Agriculture / Flickr

Long after the retardant drops end and the hot shots and news crews move on, the danger across wildfire burn scars remains. Special teams of geologists, biologists, soil scientists, and hydrologists are dispatched to assess damage, plan fixes and identify potentially fatal hazards. 

Shane Ede / Flickr, Creative Commons

The brain is all about the survival of the being. To help us survive, during the day our brains create memories that are consolidated and adapted during Rapid Eye Movement or REM sleep. But if a trauma occurs, sometimes the brain can't consolidate and adapt memories. If this occurs repeatedly it can lead to Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder or PTSD. 

CA Dept of Insurance / Flickr, Creative Commons

Nearly 1,100 homes and more than 20 businesses were destroyed by the recent Carr Fire in Shasta County. Atop the emotional and financial strain of the losses, some are finding obstacles they weren’t expecting.

NSPR’s Marc Albert spoke with California Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones about fire recovery, consumer rights and being properly prepared. 

Jones advsises that those who have a dispute with or question about their insurance or insurance company contact the California Department of Insurance.  

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