FEMA

Noah Berger / AP Photo

A financial breakthrough was announced that could help as many as 5,000 Camp Fire burn scar property owners eliminate lingering dangers.

 

The Federal Emergency Management Agency has resolved one of the obstacles to recovery — what to do with trees damaged, but left standing, by the fire.

John Locher / AP Photo


About 34 people from a host of charitable organizations were in Chico Thursday, brushing up on ways to assist Camp Fire survivors—it’s more than a full time job.

 

They arrived at the Salvation Army’s new Chico campus for a day long case manager training.

John Locher / AP Photo


A new effort is being made to reconnect with Camp Fire survivors who may have fallen through the cracks.

The consortium of government, non-profit, religious and charitable organizations called the Camp Fire Long Term Recovery Group, will hold a dozen events through Jan. 24, hoping to quantify holes and gaps in recovery efforts so far.

The Advocate


Officials may cut a deal with the Federal Emergency Management Agency that lets Camp Fire survivors buy their dwellings. 

Tuesday, the Butte County Board of Supervisors will look into possibly leveraging federal guidelines that allow FEMA to sell their units to occupants and donate them to other government agencies or certain charitable organizations. However, even if approved, potential buyers will have to come up with more than just money, Casey Hatcher Butte County’s deputy chief administrative officer said. 

It’s again time for our weekly check-in with representatives from some of the lead agencies attempting to aid Camp Fire survivors. Earlier today we welcomed Butte County spokeswoman Casey Hatcher and Paradise spokeswoman Colette Curtis into our studios, and also heard from Justin Jacobs with the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services and Mickey Rich of the Paradise Irrigation District.

Today, Colette Curtis opens our roundtable with word about the upcoming Census, which uses population figures to determine federal and state funding. 

Every Thursday NSPR checks in with the main organizations facilitating the recovery of the Camp Fire. NSPR’s Sarah Bohannon spoke to Casey Hatcher with Butte County, Collette Curtis with the Town of Paradise, Justin Jacobs with Cal OES and Debra Young with FEMA to get the latest. Young started the call with an update on FEMA’s group sites.  

Butte County Recovers

This week we get our regular update from government officials and they also answer your questions about debris removal, rebuilding and housing. Earlier this morning NSPR’s Marc Albert spoke with Rebeca Kelly of FEMA, Justin Jacobs of CalOES, Casey Hatcher of Butte County and Colette Curtis from the Town of Paradise to get the latest.

Marc Albert

For roughly 20 families, Monday was finally move-in day. The accommodations aren’t luxurious, but there’s a feeling that five months after the Camp Fire, progress is tangible.  

 

In Oroville, a stone’s throw from California’s second largest reservoir, Marianne Warner was sporting the broad grin you’d expect on a lottery winner.

Noah Berger / AP Photo


FEMA, debris removal, right of entry forms, water, building permits – there has been a lot that has happened this week. NSPR’s Marc Albert gives us a recap.

Marc Albert

  

FEMA has again increased the number of families it plans to house at a pop-up trailer park in south Chico.

 

First it was forty eight, then sixty four, now FEMA says they’re planning to house 82 families on the site, within the Hegan Lane Business Park. 

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