Paradise

Marc Albert

Fully half of the proposals developed to make Paradise more resilient to wildfire wound up dead in the water at the Paradise Town Council meeting Tuesday evening.   

Conceived in the wake of the Camp Fire, the deadliest wildfire in state history, twenty concepts, the vast majority fire related building code changes, were developed over a series of well attended public meetings.

Paradise Alliance Church

 

Paradise officials are expected to walk a fine line when they meet at the Paradise Alliance Church this evening, balancing fire resistance with reasonable costs at the outset of a lengthy reconstruction process.

A total of 20 items will be considered, some pricey, some not. One proposal would require sprinklers inside new residential construction—at an estimated cost of six to eight thousand dollars. Another is totally free and eliminates the annoyance of repeatedly cleaning out roof gutters, by prohibiting them.

 

U.S. Department of Agriculture

As Paradise begins rebuilding, some experts say a large firebreak could make a big difference.

 

The idea: a half mile deep swath of well-managed and maintained open space on the edge of town. Instead of a rat’s nest of manzanita and scotch broom, the wildland would have more fire resistant plants and be trimmed and thinned. In theory, when fire came, it would move slower, giving firefighters time to mobilize, and residents time to get out.

 

Marc Albert

Utilities throughout Paradise and some surrounding areas will be rebuilt and moved underground; a huge surprise that prompted a standing ovation at a crucial town council meeting Wednesday night.

Residents rose to their feet as new information, essentially direction from a federal judge overseeing the bankruptcy of California’s largest utility, was relayed by Aaron Johnson, a Pacific Gas & Electric Company electrical division vice president.

 

Noah Berger / AP Photo

Six months since the Camp Fire struck, officials in Butte County told KQED's Michelle Wiley that some students are experiencing the same mental health issues they had just after the fire. And they need more counselors to support them.

Pamela Beeman had been retired for five years when she got the call from Butte County.

 

Butte County Recovers

This week we get our regular update from government officials and they also answer your questions about debris removal, rebuilding and housing. Earlier this morning NSPR’s Marc Albert spoke with Rebeca Kelly of FEMA, Justin Jacobs of CalOES, Casey Hatcher of Butte County and Colette Curtis from the Town of Paradise to get the latest.

Marc Albert

Future visions of the town of Paradise were unveiled before the public yesterday and locals had a chance to rank, comment and critique reconstruction concepts advanced by residents.

 

Marc Albert

 

Paradise residents, many determined to return home, gathered at the Paradise Alliance Church Tuesday evening, where they weighed in on the Camp Fire recovery plans.

 

Rover Pass

Evacuees living in RVs, especially those ordered from their home sites after ash and fire debris was determined too toxic to live near, will have another option. 

AP Photo

Post fire housing, revenue and water figured large at Tuesday’s Butte County Board of Supervisors hearing. 

 

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