wildfire

Camp Fire Survivors — We need your help to report on food access and recovery.

North State Public Radio is reporting a series of stories about food access and recovery after the Camp Fire. We need your help to get this series right. Please share your experiences by taking our survey.

 

No identifying information you share (like your name or personal stories) will be published without your direct permission. An NSPR reporter may be in touch to follow up about your response.

 

If you'd like to connect further about food access after the Camp Fire, or about other information regarding recovery, please email us at nsprnews@csuchico.edu or leave us a message at 433-9216.      

Reconstruction continues with Camp Fire survivors continuing to apply for building permits at a brisk pace, while federal and state aid home-rehabilitation funds are being partly reconfigured into deferred-payment, low-interest loans to help fire survivors rebuild.

Meanwhile, there’s more clarity about trees at risk for toppling across privately-owned roads, including information vital for those who took initiative and removed the trees themselves. 

A breakthrough was announced with federal officials, who have OK’ed funds for logging hazard trees threatening privately-owned roads in the burn scar. County officials had lobbied heavily, arguing that without an exemption, the trees would hinder reconstruction.

Also, rates may have increased, but officials say a dozen firms are selling homeowners insurance on the ridge. We also hear from operators of a new non-profit matching fire survivors with people considering having a roommate or housemate. 

Noah Berger / AP Photo


There’s additional hope for Camp Fire survivors wanting to rebuild in the town of Paradise who are also short on cash.

 

New state money is available to help fill the hole between fire survivor’s assets, and the cost of rebuilding their home.

Noah Berger / AP Photo


Elected leaders in Butte County will consider dipping into fiscal reserves today as Camp Fire related expenses keep piling up.

 

At their meeting this morning, the Board of Supervisors will be asked to transfer about a quarter of reserve funds — $1 million — to cover expenses related to the Camp Fire.

On this week’s call: A feared lull in burn scar building permit applications hasn’t appeared, suggesting recovery and re-population will continue at a pace faster than expected. 

 

Also, the next phase of tree removal is starting to take shape and we learn more about the needs still out there from Kevin Lindstrom, Pastor at Magalia Community Church and Doreen Fogle, who helps operate the Camp Fire Resource Center, where needed items are still being distributed and sympathetic ears are available.  

On the morning of November 8, 2018, one of the most deadly and destructive wildfires in United States history destroyed the town of Paradise, California. At least 86 people died in the inferno. The California Camp Fire—Reflections and Remnants is the quintessential historical testament and reflection of that tragic day and the continuing aftermath. 

John Locher / AP Photo


A new effort is being made to reconnect with Camp Fire survivors who may have fallen through the cracks.

The consortium of government, non-profit, religious and charitable organizations called the Camp Fire Long Term Recovery Group, will hold a dozen events through Jan. 24, hoping to quantify holes and gaps in recovery efforts so far.

It’s again time for our weekly check in with representatives from agencies repairing damage left behind by the camp fire. Joining us: Paradise Spokeswoman Colette Curtis, Paradise Irrigation District Spokeswoman Mickey Rich and Justin Jacobs, a spokesman for the California Governor’s office of Emergency Services.

 

This week, Colette Curtis starts us off with a word about building permit figures and details some of the programs and experts available to speed home reconstruction in Paradise. 

Noah Berger / AP Photo


Paradise officials say a surge in end of year building permit applications shows rising confidence and interest in reconstruction.

 

After the catastrophic Camp Fire more than a year ago, the resurrection of Paradise was anything but assured. Despite the odds, Colette Curtis spokeswoman for the Town of Paradise said many residents are moving quickly in an effort to rebuild.

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