Matthew S. Schwartz

Matthew S. Schwartz is a reporter with NPR's news desk. Before coming to NPR, Schwartz worked as a reporter for Washington, DC, member station WAMU, where he won the national Edward R. Murrow award for feature reporting in large market radio. Previously, Schwartz worked as a technology reporter covering the intricacies of Internet regulation. In a past life, Schwartz was a Washington telecom lawyer. He got his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center, and his B.A. from the University of Michigan ("Go Blue!").

With President Trump soon to nominate a replacement for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court, some Democrats are returning to an idea that hasn't been seriously proposed since the days of Franklin D. Roosevelt: increasing the number of justices on the Supreme Court.

Updated at 10:38 p.m. ET

With Republican leadership united behind President Trump's decision to quickly nominate a new Supreme Court justice to fill the vacancy left by Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death on Friday, Senate Democrats are hoping to block a vote by swaying a few moderate Republicans to their side.

Updated at 3:09 p.m. ET

Almost immediately upon learning of the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, attention moved to whether Republicans would attempt to fill her seat before the election.

Many eyes turned to moderate Republican senators like Susan Collins of Maine or Lisa Murkowski of Alaska. But even more conservative Republicans have, in the past, expressed their reluctance to fill a vacancy during an election year. Chief among those is South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham.

For hours on Saturday, KPCC reporter Josie Huang kept her followers informed with regular updates on Twitter as she covered the protests and unrest around Los Angeles.

She was heading to Compton, she said, to cover the shooting of two L.A. County Sheriff's deputies, ambushed while sitting in their patrol car. The deputies were in critical condition on Sunday. The shooter was still at large.

Suddenly, Huang's Twitter feed went silent.

Just days after fire tore through the Moria refugee camp in the Greek island of Lesbos and displaced more than 12,000 people, some of those same people were tear-gassed by police while protesting the construction of a replacement camp.

Protesters say they want to leave the island altogether.

Afghanistan's warring factions have officially begun what is likely to be a long and arduous process of negotiating a peaceful and prosperous future after nearly two decades of war.

Seven people were killed in a shooting at an illegal marijuana-growing operation in Southern California that local authorities say bears the hallmarks of organized crime.

Riverside County sheriff's deputies responded to a 911 call Monday morning about an assault with a deadly weapon and shots fired. When they arrived at the large property in the remote mountain area of Aguanga, they found six people dead of gunshot wounds. A seventh person later died at a local hospital.

Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny, hospitalized in Berlin for several weeks after being poisoned, has been taken out of his medically induced coma.

Updated at 8:16 p.m. ET

At 121 degrees, Los Angeles County hit its highest temperature ever recorded this weekend, as the state swelters in a heat wave that has helped intensify the most devastating wildfire season California has experienced in years.

The record temperature was measured in Woodland Hills, northwest of downtown Los Angeles.

Firefighters in central California are searching for people stranded by a fast-moving fire that has already burned an estimated 45,000 acres. The Creek Fire started Friday evening and, fueled by timber and dry vegetation, quickly jumped the San Joaquin River and blocked evacuation routes.

Pages