Matt Fidler

Producer

Matt Fidler is a producer and sound designer with over 15 years’ experience producing nationally distributed public radio programs. He has worked for shows such as Freakonomics Radio, Selected Shorts, Studio 360, The New Yorker Radio Hour and The Takeaway. In 2017, Matt launched the language podcast Very Bad Words, hitting the #28 spot in the iTunes podcast charts.


We examine the complex series of fault ruptures and earthquakes that struck near Ridgecrest in Southern California over the July 4 weekend of 2019. A 6.4 magnitude temblor on the evening of July 4 was followed by in even bigger magnitude 7.1 event just over 24 hours later that may have been triggered in a process called cross faulting during the earlier quake.

Scott Dressel-Martin

Alpine and Steppe plants are uniquely interesting individuals and communities of plants that thrive in extreme conditions of high elevations and dry locations around the globe.

 

This week on Cultivating Place, we head to high ground with Mike Kintgen, Curator of Alpine Plants at the Denver Botanic Gardens in Denver CO and member of the American Penstemon Society to learn more about these charismatic plant communities. Join us!

Tosh Chiang / Flickr

 

We head up the road this week in search of cool once again. To the mountains this time—lonely Lassen Volcanic National Park, fully accessible only in summer and early fall.

But do cultivate a better sense of direction than the park’s namesake, Danish immigrant Peter Lassen. According to a journal entry by his friend, Gen. John Bidwell, Lassen “was a singular man, very industrious, very ingenious, and very fond of pioneering—in fact, of the latter, very stubbornly so. He had great confidence in his own power as a woodsman, but, strangely enough, he always got lost.” This almost led to his lynching on at least one occasion, when he confused Lassen and Shasta peaks while guiding a party of immigrants westward, taking them more than 200 miles out of their way. Oops.

Amazon

Prolific photographer-writer Douglas Keister more typically photographs and writes about cemeteries, but has also written novels, and now a memoir. 

 

In Heart-Land: Growing Up in the Middle of Everything, Keister looks back at his childhood growing up in Lincoln, Nebraska, as the middle child, in the middle of the century, in the middle of the country.

 

Also featured in this show, another Nebraska native, “Gorgeous George”, is the subject of a commentary by Richard Parker. 

YouTube


In this episode Dave visits with Stockton Rush, founder and CEO of OceanGate in Everett, Washington. The company is working on an ambitious plan to make the deep ocean accessible to paying customers as well as scientists starting with a set of expeditions next year to visit the most famous of all shipwrecks -- RMS Titanic.

 

Rush seems like a character right out of an adventure novel, getting a commercial jet pilot's license at 19 years old and working as a flight test engineer at Edwards Air Force Base before turning his attention to engineer submarines and submersibles to explore the biggest volume of our planet -- the sea beneath the waves. 

 

Kristelle Boulos

On Cultivating Place this week, we speak with two Landscape Architects who came together to create and offer out to the gardening world beautiful, functional gardens that are inspired, interesting, innovative and accessible to all. 

 

 

Meg Herndon and Sandra Nam Cioffi share more about the concept behind their Plant Me a Rainbow, based on this garden life as a crucible in which your own values become clear, these two women created a plan to help more people create richly flowering gardens. 

Bob Wick / U.S. Bureau of Land Management

We head up the road this week in search of natural air conditioning, along the California coast again. The Lost Coast, this time, that unruly stretch between Fort Bragg and Eureka that made even road builders give up—which is why Highway 1 and 101 angle inland in these parts. 

Locals, of course, snort at the very idea that this splendid area was ever lost. It’s always been here, albeit shrouded in fog most of the summer and inundated with rain otherwise. California’s isolated “Lost Coast,” virtually uninhabited and more remote than any other stretch of coastline in the Lower 48, has since been found by folks looking to get away from all those other folks.

Amazon

Shelli Renée Joye received a degree in Electrical Engineering, then pursued a contemplative practice with a Buddhist meditation master.

She moved to Shingletown from San Francisco to live in a quiet natural setting and write a dissertation.  

 

Among the seven books that she has published is a new book, Developing Supersensible Perception.   

Michael Balint / Flickr

 

It’s August, hot and sure to get hotter. We head up the road this week in search of natural air conditioning, starting with the coast. The redwood coast, to get specific, one of the most unique environments on earth—moist, mild-mannered forest where old-growth coast redwood communities are making their last stand. Again. 

Once millions strong, California’s native population of coast redwoods has been whittled down through logging and agriculture. Only isolated groves survive, along a strip of foggy coast now reaching from Big Sur up into southern Oregon. Ancestors of these Sequoia sempervirens, or ever-living sequoia trees—quite different from the Sierra big trees honored at Yosemite and Sequoia National Parks—were well established here, and throughout the Northern Hemisphere, when dinosaurs roamed the earth.

Amazon

In his book Smart & Solo: The blueprint for efficient and enjoyable solo travel, Randell Green provides a guide for solo travelers. He provides insights and tips on how to plan your next adventure, how to maximize transportation and lodging, and how to follow his “emerald rule“ when traveling.  

 

About Randell Carlton Green:

 

As a dual citizen of the United Kingdom & United States, Randell Carlton Green has always had a deep admiration for exploring new cultures. He is a Ravenclaw, fish & chips aficionado, and right now is somewhere anxiously planning his next excursion. When not adding new passport stamps, he resides in Arizona in the United States.