California

Albert Lam

This week we head up the road to revisit Joshua Tree, about an hour north of Coachella Valley and party-central Palm Springs. Temperatures are 100-plus most of the summer, so this isn’t most people’s idea of an ideal summer retreat, though on the plus side: in summer, you can grab a prime camp spot even on weekends without a reservation. In winter it’s crazy-popular (meaning, congested), so spring and fall can be the best for Joshua Tree.

Prayitno

This week we stop off in once-sleepy San Miguel, a spot in the road just north of Paso Robles, not quite so sleepy now that Central Coast wineries have attracted fame, fortunes, and the fortunate.

 

Centerpiece of the tiny town is Mission San Miguel Arcàngel, 16th of California’s 21 missions, originally built in 1797 and still an active parish church. The mission has been brought low before, by fire or earthquakes and their aftermath—and early on, first in 1806. The rebuilt church, with tiled, not thatched roofs this time, rising again in 1821. As an agricultural enterprise Mission San Miguel was immensely successful, like others in the area. Its holdings extended 18 miles to the south, 18 miles to the north, 66 miles to the east, into and across the great Central Valley, and 35 miles west, to the Pacific Ocean.

Ed Bierman

 

 


 

We head up the road this week to another Spanish-era mission—Mission San Juan Bautista, or St. John the Baptist, California’s 15th mission. One of the most intriguing stories about San Juan Bautista is almost invisible. Tucked away in the mission museum are a couple of original choir books from Father Pedro Estevan Tapis, which demonstrate the Spanish technique of using colors or textures to teach polyphonic music. And teach it he did. The fame of the padre’s boys choir in the early 1800s earned San Juan Bautista the nickname “Mission of Music.”

Kenneth J. Gill

 

 

 


We visit the Carmel Mission this week or, more properly, Mission Basilica San Carlos Borromeo del Río Carmelo, the second Spanish mission established in Alta California by the Franciscan Father Junípero Serra. But you could be forgiven if you came to think of the Carmel Mission as California’s first, because Monterey, where it was initially established, quickly became both the cultural and military capital of Spain’s settlements here. It was definitely “first” for Father Serra, who primarily served here, died here, and was buried here, in the chapel.

Photo used courtesy of Vincent Bellino

Happy California Native Plant Week! The California Floristic Province is home to on the order of 6,500 native plant species and there are those among us who love and want to ensure the long life of the genetics and habitats of every single one. Today, in celebration of California Native Plant Week, we’re hearing from a selection of those voices, including Native Plant Home Gardener Vincent Bellino. Join us!

Christopher Michel

We head up the road this week to Joshua Tree, about an hour north of Coachella Valley and party-central Palm Springs. But if you’re going you’ll need to put pedal to the metal—or bike shoes to the pedal metal—quite soon, because by June it gets hot, an average high of 100-plus through the summer. Speaking of the plus side: In summer, you can grab a prime camp spot even on weekends without a reservation.

California To Release 2018 Insurance Rates Amid Uncertainty

Aug 1, 2017
Kevin Morris / Flickr

California officials plan to release next year's monthly premiums Tuesday for people who buy individual insurance plans under former President Barack Obama's health care overhaul.

California sits atop a massive reserve of water so large, it blows state estimates right out of the proverbial you-know-what.

In scientific findings published this week, Stanford University researchers estimated that official state forecasts of California’s groundwater reserves may be off by as much as a factor of three.

Brown Signs California $15/Hour Minimum Wage

Apr 5, 2016
Andrew Nixon / Capital Public Radio

The California minimum wage is officially heading for $15 an hour.

One week after announcing a deal with labor unions making a November ballot push, Governor Jerry Brown signed a law that will incrementally raise the statewide minimum wage. It will reach $15 an hour in 2023 for businesses with 25 or fewer employees, and a year earlier for all others.

Brown signed the measure in Los Angeles Monday.

Andrew Nixon / Capital Public Radio

California Gov. Jerry Brown says he’s reached a deal with labor unions to raise the state’s minimum wage to $15 an hour.  California would be the first state to approve a minimum wage that high.

Under the deal, California’s minimum wage would increase gradually until it hits $15 an hour in 2022 – with future increases pegged to inflation.

“I’m hoping what happens in California will not stay in California but spread all across the country,” Brown said.

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