water

Wikipedia


Although president Trump promised California growers more water by reserving less for the environment, the clouds haven’t cooperated. 

 

Officials yesterday announced farmers dependent on water stored behind federally owned dams will likely have to make do with less this coming year. 

William Croyle / California Department of Water Resources


Since the Oroville Dam Spillway crisis in 2017 and the Camp Fire the following year, there's been a lot of talk about whether or not a siren system could help alert people to an evacuation.

 

News sirens being tested at the Oroville Dam are not that.

All Trails


After the Camp Fire, damage and contamination to water lines in Paradise was extreme and considered nearly unprecedented. Just more than a year later, officials say restoration is well on its way. 

 

The contamination was caused by melting plastic pipes and meters. As water pressure dropped off during the inferno, a vacuum formed in the pipes, pulling toxic gases into the lines.

Eren Eris / Flickr Creative Commons

Two families of toxic industrial chemicals have shown up in the sources of water local utilities deliver to area households, according to a report by the Environmental Working Group, a Washington DC-based organization.

 

DrainageDitchTMDL-StPeter / Flickr, Creative Commons

The acronyms GSA, GSP and SGMA may not mean anything to you. But if you rely on a well for your water, it might be time to start paying attention. SGMA is the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act, which was was passed in 2014. It requires local agencies to submit management plans by 2022. If you want to have any input on how agencies are going to manage your groundwater, now is the time to get involved.

PETER SIMS / Flickr, Creative Commons

“Hello, this is Lupe Green. I’m calling from Tehama County, California and my question is how is the issue of water resources for the North State being addressed? I am concerned about the availability of water in the North State over time, given climate change, droughts, increased acres of orchards, and water demands from the southern part of the state. Will the many individual water wells run dry?”

The northern Sacramento Valley is lined with walnut orchards, almond orchards and the communities we call home. All of this takes water, and a lot of it. If you rely on a well, then Lupe is right, there are a number of things that you should be concerned about; especially in an ever changing political and environmental climate. 

USFWS Pacific Southwest Region / Flickr

California’s largest water district has given key support to a 17-billion-dollar water project, long sought by Governor Jerry Brown. The vote Tuesday would fund twin tunnels under the Sacramento San Joaquin Delta, which will send water to Central and Southern California.

The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California agreed to take on about two-thirds of the cost of the giant project. It calls for two forty-foot-wide, 35-mile-long pipes to extend under the Delta, carrying water from the northern end that can be pumped south and east.

Photo courtesy Hunter Ten Broeck

This week on Cultivating Place, we talk land and water with Hunter Ten Broeck of WaterWise Landscapes Inc. in Albuquerque, NM. No matter where we live, or how differently our land and our water supplies and sources may look, our gardens and our nature love are wholly interdependent with these two much larger elemental forces.

Marc Albert

 

According to the old saw, in California, whiskey is for drinking, and water is for fighting. 

 

And the fighting never seems to stop. 

 

Last night, the Federal Bureau of Reclamation held the final of three mandatory meetings to collect public comment on a new initiative announced in the fall: maximizing the amount of water delivered to San Joaquin Valley agriculture and cities farther south, maximizing electricity generated by hydropower at California’s dams and re-evaluating protections and consideration for creatures deemed threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act. 

 

From the looks of the “bathtub ring” around Lake Oroville, the vise of drought is quickly tightening around California’s neck. Fortunately, those looks are quite deceiving.

If you’ve had a gander recently at the largest state-owned reservoir in California, you’d might have a feeling of deja vu. It’s looking much like it did during the depths of the state’s recent drought.

Pages