Camp Fire

Marc Albert

 


 

Alyssa Nolan is one of those cape-less heroes.  A new mother made homeless when 2008’s Humboldt Fire swept through some of the same areas as last year’s Camp Fire, she turned a long-held aspiration of getting a tiny home for herself into a full-time charitable mission. Building tiny homes for fire survivors who’ve lost just about everything.  

 

Her workshop is a vacant gravel lot behind a former Ford dealership in downtown Oroville. There’s no electricity available so Nolan makes her own, filling a generator with gas she buys out of her own pocket. 


In this episode of “After Paradise,” we commemorate the year anniversary of the Camp Fire by focusing on where we are now, 364 days after the fire. We’ll hear from those working in mental health about how the one year mark is triggering stress and anxiety for many in the community, and about practical ways to manage. We’ll hear about recovery from survivors living in communities all over the Camp Fire burn scar. And we’ll visit with a few people providing a message of hope. It’s been a long road, and it may not feel like it now, but we can turn the challenges and devastation of this disaster into Post Traumatic growth. 

 

In honor of the one year anniversary of the Camp Fire, Cultivating Place is joined this week by Douglas Kent, author of Firescaping, and Calli-Jane DeAnda and Ben Hart of the Butte County Fire Safe Council to talk about the importance of gardening and gardeners modeling important land care and stewardship ethic in fire country. Join us.

Noah Berger / AP Photo

  

After a disaster like last year’s Camp Fire, many people struggle with distress, depression and anxiety. These feelings are normal and help is available.

Resources and advice for helping you cope can be found at buttecountyrecovers.org, and below. 

General Advice


It’s again time for our weekly check-in with representatives from some of the lead agencies attempting to help Camp Fire survivors. Joining us is Justin Jacobs, representing the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services, Colette Curtis spokeswoman for the town of Paradise, Butte County Spokeswoman Casey Hatcher and Mickey Rich for the Paradise Irrigation District. 

Douglas Kesiter

Author photographer Douglas Keister published People, Places, & Pieces of Paradise on the anniversary of the devastating Camp Fire. Stunning images from the fire’s ignition on November 8, 2018, to the fire’s aftermath, along with portraits and sketches of citizens and survivors. 

Chico News & Review

Chico physician Dr. Kelley Otani combines what he learned in his medical training with healing practices from other sources. The principles in his book, Paradox of Conscious Healing, have been tested by his patients. He is joined in the studio with some of his patients who survived the Camp Fire on November 2019.

Dr. R. Kelley Otani is a board-certified physician specializing in physical medicine and rehabilitation. He graduated from the University of California, Davis, and did his residency at the University of Washington.

It’s again time for our weekly check-in with representatives from some of the lead agencies attempting to aid Camp Fire survivors. Earlier today we welcomed Butte County spokeswoman Casey Hatcher and Paradise spokeswoman Colette Curtis into our studios, and also heard from Justin Jacobs with the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services and Mickey Rich of the Paradise Irrigation District.

Today, Colette Curtis opens our roundtable with word about the upcoming Census, which uses population figures to determine federal and state funding. 

Noah Berger / AP Photo

A local non-profit developer received a bit more than half a million dollars in grants earlier this week to speed affordable housing production in the region in the Camp Fire’s wake.

Community Housing Improvement Program or CHIP, which is building or about to break ground on affordable subdivisions in Cottonwood, Corning, Orland, Biggs and Williams, received $560,000 from the North Valley Community Foundation’s Butte Strong Fund. 

Matt Fidler

 

Wildfires are no longer isolated to our forests in California. They now also threaten our cities. On the fourth episode of California Burning, we focus on where urban and wild spaces meet and hear from people who have experienced some of the most tragic fires in California’s history.

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