Camp Fire

After Paradise: Two Years

Nov 10, 2020

It's been two years since the catastrophic Camp Fire ripped through Paradise, Magalia, Concow, and surrounding communities. In this special report, we look back at lessons learned from that tragedy... from fire management to affordable housing.

 

Also have a conversation with the Butte County sheriff about how his office has used what happened in the Camp Fire to inform multiple crises since then. And Up the Road's Kim Weir shares stories from the Ridge.

Amazon

Two years ago, on Nov. 8, 2018, the Camp Fire set blaze when a faulty electric transmission line sparked just outside Paradise. 

More than 13,000 homes were destroyed, 85 lives were lost, and 27,000 people struggled to escape with their lives. 

Alastair Gee And Dani Anguiano, journalists for The Guardian, investigated the most destructive American wildfire in a century in their book, "Fire in Paradise: An American Tragedy."

Don Hankins

Dave learns about fighting fire with fire in this episode as he talks to CSU Chico Professor of Geography Don Hankins. Dr. Hankins teaches a course called "Pyrogeography" examining the role of fire on both landscapes and the communities that inhabit them. Hankins is a firm believer in the importance of using prescribed burning techniques to control fuel loads and enhance the native ecology of areas throughout California that evolved with fire as a natural element of their ecosystems.

Amazon

Two years ago, on Nov. 8, 2018, the Camp Fire set blaze when a faulty electric transmission line sparked just outside Paradise. 

More than 13,000 homes were destroyed, 85 lives were lost, and 27,000 people struggled to escape with their lives. 

 

Alastair Gee And Dani Anguiano, journalists for The Guardian, investigated the most destructive American wildfire in a century in their book, "Fire in Paradise: An American Tragedy."

Camp Fire Survivors — We need your help to report on food access and recovery.

North State Public Radio is reporting a series of stories about food access and recovery after the Camp Fire. We need your help to get this series right. Please share your experiences by taking our survey.

 

No identifying information you share (like your name or personal stories) will be published without your direct permission. An NSPR reporter may be in touch to follow up about your response.

 

If you'd like to connect further about food access after the Camp Fire, or about other information regarding recovery, please email us at nsprnews@csuchico.edu or leave us a message at 433-9216.      

NSPR's Camp Fire Weekly Call: 3/12

Mar 12, 2020

Reconstruction continues with Camp Fire survivors continuing to apply for building permits at a brisk pace, while federal and state aid home-rehabilitation funds are being partly reconfigured into deferred-payment, low-interest loans to help fire survivors rebuild.

Meanwhile, there’s more clarity about trees at risk for toppling across privately-owned roads, including information vital for those who took initiative and removed the trees themselves. 

NSPR's Camp Fire Weekly Call: 3/5

Mar 5, 2020

A breakthrough was announced with federal officials, who have OK’ed funds for logging hazard trees threatening privately-owned roads in the burn scar. County officials had lobbied heavily, arguing that without an exemption, the trees would hinder reconstruction.

Also, rates may have increased, but officials say a dozen firms are selling homeowners insurance on the ridge. We also hear from operators of a new non-profit matching fire survivors with people considering having a roommate or housemate. 

Feds Expand Burn Scar Tree Removal

Mar 4, 2020
Noah Berger / AP Photo

A financial breakthrough was announced that could help as many as 5,000 Camp Fire burn scar property owners eliminate lingering dangers.

 

The Federal Emergency Management Agency has resolved one of the obstacles to recovery — what to do with trees damaged, but left standing, by the fire.

Noah Berger / AP Photo


There’s additional hope for Camp Fire survivors wanting to rebuild in the town of Paradise who are also short on cash.

 

New state money is available to help fill the hole between fire survivor’s assets, and the cost of rebuilding their home.

Fire Has County Tapping Reserves

Feb 25, 2020
Noah Berger / AP Photo


Elected leaders in Butte County will consider dipping into fiscal reserves today as Camp Fire related expenses keep piling up.

 

At their meeting this morning, the Board of Supervisors will be asked to transfer about a quarter of reserve funds — $1 million — to cover expenses related to the Camp Fire.

Pages