Camp Fire

Camp Fire Survivors — We need your help to report on food access and recovery.

North State Public Radio is reporting a series of stories about food access and recovery after the Camp Fire. We need your help to get this series right. Please share your experiences by taking our survey.

 

No identifying information you share (like your name or personal stories) will be published without your direct permission. An NSPR reporter may be in touch to follow up about your response.

 

If you'd like to connect further about food access after the Camp Fire, or about other information regarding recovery, please email us at nsprnews@csuchico.edu or leave us a message at 433-9216.      

Reconstruction continues with Camp Fire survivors continuing to apply for building permits at a brisk pace, while federal and state aid home-rehabilitation funds are being partly reconfigured into deferred-payment, low-interest loans to help fire survivors rebuild.

Meanwhile, there’s more clarity about trees at risk for toppling across privately-owned roads, including information vital for those who took initiative and removed the trees themselves. 

A breakthrough was announced with federal officials, who have OK’ed funds for logging hazard trees threatening privately-owned roads in the burn scar. County officials had lobbied heavily, arguing that without an exemption, the trees would hinder reconstruction.

Also, rates may have increased, but officials say a dozen firms are selling homeowners insurance on the ridge. We also hear from operators of a new non-profit matching fire survivors with people considering having a roommate or housemate. 

Noah Berger / AP Photo

A financial breakthrough was announced that could help as many as 5,000 Camp Fire burn scar property owners eliminate lingering dangers.

 

The Federal Emergency Management Agency has resolved one of the obstacles to recovery — what to do with trees damaged, but left standing, by the fire.

Noah Berger / AP Photo


There’s additional hope for Camp Fire survivors wanting to rebuild in the town of Paradise who are also short on cash.

 

New state money is available to help fill the hole between fire survivor’s assets, and the cost of rebuilding their home.

Noah Berger / AP Photo


Elected leaders in Butte County will consider dipping into fiscal reserves today as Camp Fire related expenses keep piling up.

 

At their meeting this morning, the Board of Supervisors will be asked to transfer about a quarter of reserve funds — $1 million — to cover expenses related to the Camp Fire.

On this week’s call: A feared lull in burn scar building permit applications hasn’t appeared, suggesting recovery and re-population will continue at a pace faster than expected. 

 

Also, the next phase of tree removal is starting to take shape and we learn more about the needs still out there from Kevin Lindstrom, Pastor at Magalia Community Church and Doreen Fogle, who helps operate the Camp Fire Resource Center, where needed items are still being distributed and sympathetic ears are available.  

John Locher / AP Photo


About 34 people from a host of charitable organizations were in Chico Thursday, brushing up on ways to assist Camp Fire survivors—it’s more than a full time job.

 

They arrived at the Salvation Army’s new Chico campus for a day long case manager training.

On this week’s call: Paradise Spokeswoman Colette Curtis discusses the newly opened Building Resiliency Center, Butte County Deputy Chief Administrative Officer Casey Hatcher has the details on plan to help property owners remove fire-damaged trees endangering private roads, and Marcella Seay of the Upper Ridge Community Council discusses home insurance issues and a debate going on in Magalia about the size of homes and should smaller houses be allowed.   

VideoHive

 

 


Those flummoxed by soaring prices or the sudden unavailability of homeowners insurance may gain insights at a meeting in Magalia tonight.

 

Organized by a local community group, tonight’s meeting is specifically aimed at those feeling financially squeezed or entirely shut out by home insurers.

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